Marco…………………Polo!

Come to Bacchus weekend mornings to make-your-own bloody mary with one of Tuki's signature wild card additions and watch some of the Olympic games broadcast from Rio. Enjoy the breadth of sports offered all day — like the variety of cocktails available at Bacchus! Tonight, DJ Kuya spins his magic at 10PM. No cover, always fun.

In July 1996 Life featured this image on its cover:

Four members of the US Olympic Water Polo team that played in Atlanta in 1996. From L-R: Rick McNair, Alex Rousseau, Chris Humbert, Chris Duplanty. Photo by Joe McNally.

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The men who play water polo are some of the fittest men in the world. Their tight, toned and sinewy bodies tread water for long periods. For the rules of water polo, click here.

There are countless hunks who have played water polo through the the years. Here are some recent hotties: 

Water polo as a team sport began in mid nineteenth-century England and Scotland, where water sports were a feature of county fairs and festivals. Men's water polo was the first team sport introduced at the modern Olympic games in 1900.

Some of the best water polo athletes ever include Spain's adorably toothy Manuel Estiarte who played in a record six Olympics and led in scoring for four of them.

manuelestiarteimages.jpg

Dezso Gyarmati of Hungary won water polo medals at five successive Olympic Games (gold 1952, 1956, 1964; silver 1948; bronze 1960), a record in water polo. Another major figure in the sport was Tamás Faragó. who led Hungary to Olympic Medals in 1972, 1976 and 1980. The play of American Terry Schroeder led the US to its first Olympic silver medals in 1984 and 1988.

The most famous water polo match in history is probably the 1956 Summer Olympics semi-final match between Hungary and the USSR. As the athletes left for the games, the Hungarian revolution began, and the Soviet army crushed the uprising. Many of the Hungarian athletes vowed never to return home, and felt their only means of fighting back was by victory in the pool. The confrontation was the most bloody and violent water polo game in history, in which the pool reputedly turned red from blood. The Hungarians defeated the Soviets 4–0 before the game was called off in the final minute to prevent angry Hungarians in the crowd reacting to Valentin Prokopov punching Ervin Zador's eye open.

The event was dramatized in this short film below:

The Hungarians went on to win the Olympic gold medal by defeating Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final. Half of the Hungarian Olympic delegation defected after the games. A 2006 documentary by Lucy Liu, Freedom's Fury recounts the events of the 1956 Hungarian uprising and climaxing with this politicized game.

Let's hope there's no such fury in the water in Rio. Just good clean fun....with underwater "Speedo Cam" views. :-)

Enjoy the view today and tonight at Bacchus. Drinks are tasty and the service is outstanding. Never a cover. Always fun. Drink with us!

 

 

 

 

8/15 TRIVIA hint: Marco Polo was from Venice. 

JL